Living 2.0

Insights for a Better Life

Category: General Health (page 1 of 9)

Hair dyes and straighteners linked to higher breast cancer

Many hair products contain endocrine‐disrupting compounds and carcinogens.

Rosie McCall, writing in Newsweek »

Women who regularly use permanent hair dye could be increasing their risk of breast cancer up to 60 percent, according to scientists writing in the International Journal of Cancer.

A study based on the medical records of more than 45,000 women found a positive correlation between permanent hair dye and breast cancer—particularly among those who are black.

While the paper is based on patterns and trends and, as such, doesn’t confirm a direct cause, it adds to research suggesting there may be carcinogens lurking in commonly-used beauty products.

Read the whole article in Newsweek »

Source » International Journal of Cancer

More » NPR, Fast Company

Life expectancy in the U.S. is getting shorter » Alcohol related liver disease and deaths on the rise

Reuters »

Americans today are expected to live shorter lives than just a few years ago, in contrast with trends seen in other developed nations, and rising deaths from alcohol-related liver disease may be partly to blame, researchers say.

Analyzing data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, they found that U.S. deaths from alcohol-related liver disease (ALD) are at their highest levels since 1999 and have risen every year since 2006 in nearly every racial, ethnic and age group.

[…]

The researchers analyzed causes of death for people aged 25 and older in the two decades since 1997, and found that 2017 had the highest rates of death from ALD, at 13.1 per 100,000 deaths in men and 5.6 per 100,000 in women. That compares to 1999 ALD mortality rates of 10.6 per 100,000 in men and 3.3 per 100,000 in women.

Mortality rates and recent increases in ALD diagnoses were particularly pronounced among middle-aged adults, Native Americans and non-Hispanic whites, the researchers report in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Read the whole article at Reuters »

Related » CBC News » U.S. life expectancy being driven down by middle-aged deaths, study suggests

Air pollution causes brain structure changes that resemble Alzheimer’s disease

Nicholas Bakalar »

Over 11 years of follow-up, they found that the greater the women’s exposure to PM 2.5, the tiny particulate matter that easily penetrates the lungs and bloodstream, the lower their scores on the cognitive tests.

After excluding cases of dementia and stroke, they also found a possible reason for the declining scores: The M.R.I. results showed that increased exposure to PM 2.5 was associated with increased brain atrophy, even before clinical symptoms of dementia had appeared. The study is in the journal Brain.

“PM 2.5 alters brain structure, which then accelerates memory decline,” said the lead author, Diana Younan, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Southern California. “I just want people to be aware that air pollution can affect their health, and possibly their brains.”

Read the whole article at the NY Times »

Published article in the journal Brain » Particulate matter and episodic memory decline mediated by early neuroanatomic biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease

Video » Causes of Death in Comparison

The number one cause of death worldwide are cardiovascular diseases, by a mile.

Even among smokers, people who eat more fiber and yogurt may be less likely to develop lung cancer

Lisa Rapaport »

Compared to people who never ate yogurt, those who consumed the most yogurt were 19% less likely to develop lung cancer, the analysis found.

People who had the most fiber in their diets, meanwhile, were 17% less likely to develop lung cancer than those who ate the least fiber.

And individuals with the highest fiber intake and highest yogurt consumption were 33% less likely than those with the lowest consumption of both to develop lung cancer, the study team reports in JAMA Oncology.

Read the whole article at Reuters »

Apple is removing vaping and e-cigarette apps from the App Store

As deaths related to e-cigarettes increase, Apple is taking a stand.

Ina Fried, Mike Allen »

Apple in a statement to Axios: “We take great care to curate the App Store as a trusted place for customers, particularly youth, to download apps. We’re constantly evaluating apps, and consulting the latest evidence, to determine risks to users’ health and well-being.”

  • “Recently, experts ranging from the CDC to the American Heart Association have attributed a variety of lung injuries and fatalities to e-cigarette and vaping products, going so far as to call the spread of these devices a public health crisis and a youth epidemic.”
  • “We agree, and we’ve updated our App Store Review Guidelines to reflect that apps encouraging or facilitating the use of these products are not permitted. As of today, these apps are no longer available to download.”

Read the whole article on Axios »

More » NY Times, The Mac Observer, The Mercury News, The Verge

Related »

Reuters » U.S. vaping-related deaths rise to 42, cases of illness to 2,172

CBC » U.S. teen gets double lung transplant after ‘enormous’ vaping damage

Being kind could help you live longer

Lauren Turner, writing in BBC »

Columbia University doctor Kelli Harding has been examining the phenomenon in her recent book, The Rabbit Effect.

She says: “It helps the immune system, blood pressure, it helps people to live longer and better. It’s pretty amazing because there’s an ample supply and you can’t overdose on it. There’s a free supply. It’s right there.”

A 4-day workweek at Microsoft Japan boosted employees’ productivity

Microsoft experimented with a four-day workweek this past August. Employees received Fridays as paid leave. Not 92% of employees were happy with the program.

Humza Aamir, writing in Techspot » 

All of 2,300 employees working at Microsoft Japan had three-day weekends in August this year, as part of the company’s ‘Work Life Choice Challenge.’

[…]

Getting an extra day off every week made for improvements in several areas, including productivity and operational costs. Sales per employee, used to determine productivity, rose by 39.9 percent as compared to figures in August 2018, while remaining closed for an extra day reduced the firm’s electricity costs by 23.1 percent and saw a 58.7 percent decline in paper printing.

Given that employees had only four days to work, meetings were capped at 30 minutes, while remote conferences were increased to eliminate commuting where possible. The experiment also incorporated self-development and family wellness schemes and received positive feedback by the majority of employees, 92.1 percent of whom liked the shorter workweek.

More » The Inquirer, Interesting Engineering, Bored Panda

People with stress disorders have a higher risk of life-threatening infections

Lisa Rapaport, writing for Reuters »

“Severe or prolonged emotional stress causes alterations in multiple bodily functions through dysregulation in the release of stress hormones,” said Dr. Huan Song, lead author of the study and a researcher at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm.

“The hypothesis behind our research is that a severe reaction to trauma or other life stressors, through these pathways, leads to impaired immune function and thereby susceptibility to infection,” Song said by email.

[…]

People with stress disorders were 47% more likely to develop infections than those without any history of stress-disorders.

Read more »

Research » Stress related disorders and subsequent risk of life threatening infections: population based sibling controlled cohort study

Research » Stress related disorders and physical health

Canadian adults receive failing grade on overall physical activity report card

ParticipACTION, a non-profit group that promotes healthy living, released the first-ever Report Card on Physical Activity for Adults yesterday, giving adults living in Canada a “D” for overall physical activity.

The report stated that even though 83 percent of adults think physical inactivity is a serious health issue, only 16 percent meet the national guidelines of 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity each week.

The research shows that 29 percent of adults in Canada fall within the low active lifestyle category and adults 18 to 79 years old are sedentary for almost 10 hours per day.

The research also shows that sedentary time increases with age and adults 65 and older are spending the most time inactive. This is extra concerning as for the first time in Canadian history, adults over the age of 65 make up a larger percentage of our population than those aged 15 and under.

Physical inactivity can lead to increased risk of chronic diseases, cognitive decline, slips and falls, and social isolation. We can’t stop aging, but we can age better with physical activity.

Fortunately, the Report Card is not all negative. 74 percent of adults in Canada say they have strong intentions to be physically active within the next six months. Perhaps they just require a little extra motivation.

As we age, natural changes such as slowed reaction times and decreased muscle and bone strength contribute to an increase in slips and falls. Engaging in activities like strength training or tai chi can help participants meet their weekly activity goals while improving balance, core strength, and stability.

Research shows that being physically active can also help protect against the onset of dementia and slow its progression. Regular brain stimulation along with physical activity can extend our years of strong brain health.

About 20 percent of adults in Canada experience some level of loneliness or isolation. Older adults are at higher risk due to a lack of mobility and shrinking social networks. Staying active, and making time to get active with others helps to build social connections and enhances community engagement.

Source: ParticipACTION

More » CBC

« Older posts

© 2019 Living 2.0

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑