Living 2.0

Living Better

Category: Nutrition (page 1 of 6)

Drinking fruit juice tied to increased diabetes risk

The research suggests it is healthier to consume coffee, tea, or water.

Lisa Rapaport, writing for Reuters »

After accounting for how much people weighed and their overall eating patterns, researchers found that those who increased their total consumption of sugary drinks by a half serving a day over four years were 16% more likely to develop diabetes over the next four-year period. With the same daily half-serving increase in artificially-sweetened drinks, the odds went up 18%.

Even though consumption of 100% fruit juices has been considered a healthy alternative to sugar-sweetened beverages because of the vitamins and minerals in fruit juices, they typically contain similar amounts of sugar and calories as sugar-sweetened beverages,” said Jean-Philippe Drouin-Chartier, lead author of the study and a nutrition researcher at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston.

The study results “raise concerns about the negative health effects of sugary beverages, regardless of whether the sugar is added or naturally occurring,” Drouin-Chartier said by email.

Telegraph » An extra half glass of fruit juice a day could sharply increase diabetes risk

Drinking an extra half a glass of fruit juice a day could increase the risk of diabetes by 15 per cent, research by Harvard University suggests.

The study of more than 190,000 men and women found all types of sugary soft drink were linked to a raised chance of developing type two diabetes.

Bur fruit juice appeared to carry significantly higher risks than drinks with added sugar, which appeared to increase the chance of diabetes by 9 per cent.

Diabetes U.K. » Fruit juice and diet drinks linked with increased type 2 diabetes risk

The findings showed that each half-serving increase in consumption of sugary drinks (including fruit juice) was associated with a 16% increase in risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the next four years.

The related increase in risk of type 2 diabetes, over the same time-period, for each half-serving increase in consumption of artificially sweetened beverages was 18%.

The substitution of one daily serving of a sugary drink with water, coffee or tea was associated with between a 2 and 10% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

First author Jean-Philippe Drouin-Chartier, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University, said: “The study provides further evidence demonstrating the health benefits associated with decreasing sugary beverage consumption and replacing these drinks with healthier alternatives like water, coffee, or tea.”

More » American Diabetes Association

Eating nuts may limit weight gain

Lisa Rapaport, writing for Reuters »

People who increased their total nut consumption by a half-serving a day (14 grams, or about half an ounce) were 3% less likely to become obese, researchers report in The BMJ. Boosting daily walnut consumption by a similar amount was associated with a 15% lower obesity risk, while adding tree nuts like cashews and almonds was tied to an 11% lower obesity risk.

Increasing nuts in the diet may help maintain a healthy body weight in several ways, said senior study author Deirdre Tobias of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston.

“Their high healthy-fat and fiber content are more filling for longer compared with processed carbs and other more easily digested foods,” Tobias said by email.

“This may also benefit the overall quality of the diet by making less room for less-healthy snack foods,” Tobias added. “So, even though nuts are considered calorie-dense, their intake likely displaces other calories in the diet to improve long-term weight.”

Read more at Reuters »

Low-carb ‘keto’ diets have some health benefits and some risks

Lisa Rapaport, writing for Reuters »

While extremely low-carbohydrate diets may aid short term weight loss, they have mixed effects on health markers that can contribute to heart disease risk, according to new recommendations from the National Lipid Association.

Based on a review of existing research, the scientific statement emphasizes some advantages of a ketogenic, or very low-carb, diet including appetite suppression, lower lipid levels and lower blood sugar in people with diabetes.

But a keto diet is also associated with spikes in the “bad” cholesterol that can build up in blood vessels and lead to clots, known as low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).

There’s a lot more in the article that is of interest »

Certain tea bags shed billions of microplastics in each cup, and the health risks are not known

Emily Chung at the CBC writes »

“We were shocked when we saw billions of particles in a single cup of tea,” she said.

One cup from a single tea bag could contain 11.6 billion microplastic and 3.1 billion nanoplastic particles, the researchers estimated from their results, published Wednesday in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

The bits are so tiny — on average, the size of grains of dust or pollen — that the amount in one cup is about 16 micrograms or one-sixtieth of a milligram of plastic.

Read more »

Eating a plant-based diet lowers the risk of heart disease » however a new major study suggests it may also raises the risk of strokes

So what should we eat?

The NHS’s the Eatwell Guide sets out the balance of foods you need, whatever kind of diet you eat:

  • Eat at least five portions of fruit and vegetables a day
  • Base meals around higher-fibre starchy foods such as potatoes, bread, rice or pasta
  • Don’t forget protein – from lean meat, fish, seafood, pulses, tofu or unsalted nuts
  • Include dairy or dairy alternatives
  • Foods high in fat, sugars or salt should be eaten less often and in small amounts

» Read this article by Caroline Parkinson at the BBC…

People who regularly consume soft drinks have a higher risk of an early death, with the trend seen for both sugared and artificially sweetened drinks

The team say that once factors such as body mass index, diet, physical activity, smoking and education were taken into account, that translates to a 17% higher risk of death among those consuming two glasses a day compared with those drinking less than one glass a month.

The trend was seen for both sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverages. Similar results were seen for both men and women.

While sugary drinks have previously been linked to obesity, the researchers say that did not fully explain the association of high consumption with an increased risk of death.

When the team looked at specific causes of death they found frequent consumption of artificially sweetened soft drinks was associated with a higher risk of death from circulatory diseases, while sugar-sweetened soft drinks were associated with a higher risk of death from digestive disease. Soft drinks overall were also associated with a greater risk of death from Parkinson’s disease.

» Read more of the article by Nicola Davis at The Guardian…

» Updated Sept 6 » Read Death by Diet Soda? by Andrew Jacobs at the NY Times…

Results of a recent study suggest lifestyle choices plays a greater role than genetics in most cases of premature heart disease

The study, which was presented at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2019, found evidence that physical inactivity, smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, and high cholesterol play a greater role than genetics for most patients under 50 with coronary artery disease (CAD).

and

 “Our study provides strong evidence that people with a family history of premature heart disease should adopt healthy lifestyles, since their poor behaviors may be a greater contributor to heart disease than their genetics,” Sousa explained. “That means quit smoking, exercise regularly, eat a healthy diet, and get blood pressure and cholesterol levels checked.”

» Read More at MD Mag…

Eggs produced in the USA are banned in Europe & vice versa

The Stress of Separation and Detention Changes the Lives of Children

These actions have focused outrage and attention on the current U.S. Administration’s callous, racial, and white supremacist agenda.

What shocks me the most is not that these actions are supported by many Americans. The U.S.A. has a long history of problems over race. What shocks me the most is just how deep and wide the support really is.

This is the United States of America today. This is what is happening now. And there is a good chance this will continue for a while as there’s a good chance he will get reelected.

The horrific conditions under which immigrants and especially immigrant children are being held in US detention centers, rightly reminds us of the Nazi concentration camps. Lessons of the past have been forgotten.

What I’ve Learned: If their words don’t match their actions, trust their actions. More important than talk is how one lives their life and how they treat others.

Isaac Chotiner, writing for The New Yorker (paywall):

What most concerns you about what we have read about and seen from these border facilities holding children?

Oh, God, where do I begin? I think—to cut through all of the noise, the politics, the back-and-forth on the details—there are just two core issues that are screaming out. One is the fact that the forced and abrupt separation of children from their parents is a huge psychological trauma and assault. The magnitude of the nature of the crisis for a child’s health and well-being cannot be overstated. Abrupt separation from primary caregivers or parents is a major psychological emergency.

The second issue is the prolonged placement of children in institutional settings. Obviously, the two are linked in this particular situation. From the perspective of what we know about children’s health and well-being, what we know about trauma, abrupt separation is one area where we have a lot of research and a lot of evidence about its consequences. But prolonged institutionalization is a separate area in which we have an equally deep research base and knowledge about how damaging that kind of setting is for kids. We are dealing with two very well-studied, serious assaults on the health and well-being of children.

Read More…

Processed foods are a much bigger health problem than we thought

Julia Belluz writing for Vox:

In two new papers published in the BMJ, the more ultraprocessed — or industrially manufactured — foods a person ate, the more likely they were to get sick and even die. In one study, they were more likely to suffer from cardiovascular problems. The other linked an ultraprocessed diet to a higher risk of death from all causes.

Those studies followed a first-of-its-kind randomized controlled trial, out of the National Institutes of Health: Researchers found people following an ultraprocessed diet ate about 500 more calories per day than those consuming minimally processed, whole foods.

Sure, potato chips, cookies, and hot dogs are chock-full of salt, sugar, fat, and calories. They can cause us to gain weight and put us at a higher risk of diseases such as diabetes and obesity. But why? What if there’s something unique about ultraprocessed foods that primes us to overeat and leads to bad health?

And

Ultraprocessed foods are created in factories. They’re pumped full of chemicals and other additives for color, flavor, texture, and shelf life. This processing generally increases the flavor and caloric density of the foods, while stripping away the fiber, vitamins, and nutrients. So these foods are distinct from whole foods (like apples and cucumbers) and processed foods (like vegetables pickled in brine, or canned fish in oil) that rely on only salt, sugar, and oil — rather than a range of complicated additives — to preserve them or make them tastier.

Read More…

« Older posts

© 2019 Living 2.0

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑