❤️ Fresh Insights for a Better Life

Category: Living Better (Page 1 of 3)

Women hit wage parity with men on Prince Edward Island

Kevin Yarr, writing for CBC News »

Women on P.E.I. are now earning the same wages as men, according to a new report from Statistics Canada, but it may be a little early to break out the champagne.

The report found that in 2018, employed women aged 25 to 54 earned an average of $24.18 per hour and men earned $24.33. The 15-cent difference is statistically insignificant, the agency said. In 1998 there was a $1.50 difference in wages.

P.E.I. is the only province with wage parity.

Nationally there was a $4.13 difference between men ($31.05/hour) and women ($26.92). The biggest wage gap was in Alberta, where it was $6.32, although most of that difference could be explained by the different jobs men and women were doing.

Read more at CBC »

Related » Canadian Gender wage gap narrows – Canada Letter

 

88-Year Old Rafael Covarrubias Still Tends Bar in a Tux, and He Wouldn’t Have it Any Other Way

Tess Barker writing for Los Angeleno:

Tonight, Covarrubias’ bar is full of diners, and he tends to them as he has done for the last 36 years — and prior to that, another 36 years at the Sheraton in Glendale. It’s nearing the end of the month, which means diners are coming in solo to cash in on their birthday meal. Members of the Pacific Dining Car’s 1921 Club get a free entree on their birthday.

“My birthday is coming up next month,” Covarrubias says. He’ll be turning 88. “Actually, I hate birthdays. They always give me a bunch of clothes. I don’t know where to put those clothes.”

“They,” presumably are the four women he lives with: his wife, his step-daughter, his granddaughter and his great-granddaughter.

Read More…

Amsterdam to ban all petrol and diesel cars and motorbikes by 2030

Diesel cars older than 15 years will be barred from the Dutch capital next year.

Daniel Boffey writing for The Guardian:

“Pollution often is a silent killer and is one of the greatest health hazards in Amsterdam,” said the councillor responsible for the city’s traffic, Sharon Dijksma, announcing the municipality’s decision.

From next year, diesel cars that are 15 years or older will be banned from going within the A10 ring road around the Dutch capital.

Read More…

The Evidence Is Strong » Air Pollution Can Cause Dementia

Aaron Reuben, writing in Mother Jones:

Of all the new research, three studies in particular paint a stark picture of the extent to which the quality of our air can determine whether we will age with our minds intact. In one from 2018, researchers followed 130,000 older adults living in London for several years. Those exposed to higher levels of air pollutants, particularly nitrogen dioxide and fine particulate matter released by fossil fuel combustion, were significantly more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease—the most common kind of dementia—than their otherwise demographically matched peers. In total, Londoners exposed to the highest levels of air pollution were about one and a half times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s across the study period than their neighbors exposed to the lowest levels—a replication of previous findings from Taiwan, where air pollution levels are much higher.

Another, a 2017 study published in the Lancet, followed all adults living in Ontario (roughly 6 and a half million people) for over a decade and found that those who lived closer to major high-traffic roads were significantly more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease across the study period regardless of their health at baseline or socioeconomic status. Both of these studies estimated that around 6 to 7 percent of all dementia cases in their samples could be attributed to air pollution exposures.

Those studies from Canada and the UK are certainly intriguing. But the most compelling, and least reported on, study comes from the United States. It was also, incidentally, inspired by our previous reporting.

Read More…

 

Life expectancy for Americans falls even further

According to 2017 data, the life expectancy for Americans fell again. It’s now 78.6 years, down three-tenths of a year since 2014.

Economists consider life expectancy to be an important measure of a nation’s prosperity, but last year’s data paints a darker picture of health in the U.S.

One of the reasons for the drop is the sharpest annual increase in suicides in nearly a decade and a continued rise in deaths from opioid drugs.

Life expectancy for Americans fell again last year, despite growing recognition of the problems driving the decline and federal and local funds invested in stemming them.

Data the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released on Thursday show life expectancy fell by one-tenth of a year, to 78.6 years, pushed down by the sharpest annual increase in suicides in nearly a decade and a continued rise in deaths from powerful opioid drugs like fentanyl. Influenza, pneumonia and diabetes also factored into last year’s increase.

Read more at the Wall Street Journal (paywall)

If you are looking for a job, BMO ranks Canada’s best cities for jobs and affordable homes

Five years ago the top five cities were Regina, Calgary, Edmonton, Saskatoon, and Hamilton.

This year the top five are Ottawa, Quebec City, Hamilton, Edmonton, and Windsor.

Huffington Post:

“There are two key reasons to move,” BMO senior economist Robert Kavcic wrote in the report. “To find a job, if you don’t have one; or to take a better-paying job, if you do.”

BMO’s “ranking of labour market attractiveness,” as the report calls it, is purely data-driven. “Mountains vs. lakes, or seafood vs. beef, are among many other important considerations, but such lifestyle factors are ignored here,” Kavcic wrote.

BMO looked at factors such as median household income, job growth, house prices and rental rates to determine their rankings.

« Older posts

© 2020 Living 2.0

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑