❤️ Fresh Insights for a Better Life

Category: Quality of Life (Page 1 of 5)

JP Morgan economists warn climate crisis is threat to human race

Patrick Greenfield and Jonathan Watts, The Guardian »

The JP Morgan report on the economic risks of human-caused global heating said climate policy had to change or else the world faced irreversible consequences.

The study implicitly condemns the US bank’s own investment strategy and highlights growing concerns among major Wall Street institutions about the financial and reputational risks of continued funding of carbon-intensive industries, such as oil and gas.

JP Morgan has provided $75bn (£61bn) in financial services to the companies most aggressively expanding in sectors such as fracking and Arctic oil and gas exploration since the Paris agreement, according to analysis compiled for the Guardian last year.

Air quality in Toronto’s subway is worst than outdoor air and contains high levels of metals

A study of the air quality of Toronto’s subway system, conduced by the Toronto Public Health, has found levels of air pollutants on the subway are higher than those in outdoor air and contain “high levels of some metals.”

CBC News »

“Air quality data collected in the Toronto subway system shows that, as is the case for other similar subway systems, levels of fine particulate matter air pollution (PM2.5) are elevated,” De Villa wrote.

PM2.5, or particles less than 2.5 microns in diameter, are associated with cardiovascular and respiratory health issues.

Nine out of 10 Canadians who switched careers say they are happier

Some are looking for better pay, for others the motivation is opportunity for growth, or a better quality of life, and for others it may be for more corny reasons.

Brandie Weikle, writing for CBC News »

The Indeed research found that better pay was the most common reason respondents changed careers, with 63 per cent citing it as their main motivation. But 57 per cent of those who switched said they did so because they wanted more opportunity for growth.

Like Norton, 47 per cent said they enrolled in education and training programs to execute their career transformation.

Because of his long tenure as a teacher, Norton’s job as a firefighter came with a 30 per cent pay cut. But after about 3.5 years, Norton will move up pay grades and match his previous compensation.

Navarre Bailey also took a pay cut with his career change in 2017. After 13 years in corporate marketing roles, Bailey no longer felt good about how he was making a living.

Canadian and European health departments are sharing study results on new drugs and treatments online. Transparency advocates elsewhere want the same.

Barbara Mantel

This past March, Canada’s department of health changed the way it handles the huge amount of data that companies submit when seeking approval for a new drug, biological treatment, or medical device — or a new use for an existing one. For the first time, Health Canada is making large chunks of this information publicly available after it approves or rejects applications.

Within 120 days of a decision, Health Canada will post clinical study reports on a new government online portal, starting with drugs that contain novel active ingredients and adding devices and other drugs over a four-year phase-in period. These company-generated documents, often running more than 1,000 pages, summarize the methods, goals, and results of clinical trials, which test the safety and efficacy of promising medical interventions. The reports play an important role in helping regulators make their decisions, along with other information, such as raw data about individual patients in clinical trials.

So far, Health Canada has posted reports for four newly approved drugs — one to treat plaque psoriasis in adults, two to treat two different types of skin cancer, and the fourth for advanced hormone-related breast cancer — and is preparing to release reports for another 13 drugs and three medical devices approved or rejected since March. Continue reading

People who regularly consume soft drinks have a higher risk of an early death, with the trend seen for both sugared and artificially sweetened drinks

The team say that once factors such as body mass index, diet, physical activity, smoking and education were taken into account, that translates to a 17% higher risk of death among those consuming two glasses a day compared with those drinking less than one glass a month.

The trend was seen for both sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverages. Similar results were seen for both men and women.

While sugary drinks have previously been linked to obesity, the researchers say that did not fully explain the association of high consumption with an increased risk of death.

When the team looked at specific causes of death they found frequent consumption of artificially sweetened soft drinks was associated with a higher risk of death from circulatory diseases, while sugar-sweetened soft drinks were associated with a higher risk of death from digestive disease. Soft drinks overall were also associated with a greater risk of death from Parkinson’s disease.

» Read more of the article by Nicola Davis at The Guardian…

» Updated Sept 6 » Read Death by Diet Soda? by Andrew Jacobs at the NY Times…

Best Countries in 2019

U.S. News and World Report has released it’s annual Best Country Rankings.

The overall rankings are made up of nine subrankings:

  • Adventure
  • Citizenship
  • Cultural Influence
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Heritage
  • Movers
  • Open for Business
  • Power
  • Quality of Life

These are the top 10 overall:

1. 🇨🇭 Switzerland – Overall score 10.0

2.  🇯🇵 Japan – 9.8

3. 🇨🇦 Canada – 9.7

4. 🇩🇪 Germany – 9.6

5. 🇬🇧 United Kingdom – 9.4

6. 🇸🇪 Sweden – 9.3

7. 🇦🇺 Australia – 9.3

8. 🇺🇸 United States – 9.2

9. 🇳🇴 Norway – 8.8

10. 🇫🇷 France – 8.7

11. 🇳🇱 Netherlands – 8.5

12. 🇳🇿 New Zealand – 8.3

13. 🇩🇰 Denmark – 8.2

14. 🇫🇮 Finland – 8.1

15. 🇸🇬 Singapore – 7.7

Read More …

Increased Physical Activity May Protect Against Cognitive Decline and Ward Off Alzheimer’s Onset

Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital have found that higher levels of daily physical activity may protect against cognitive decline and brain tissue loss in adults who are believed to be at greater risk for Alzheimer’s disease. The best results were found among the research participants who took more than 8,900 steps per day.

Traci Pedersen, writing in PsychCentral:

“One of the most striking findings from our study was that greater physical activity not only appeared to have positive effects on slowing cognitive decline, but also on slowing the rate of brain tissue loss over time in normal people who had high levels of amyloid plaque in the brain,” said Jasmeer Chhatwal, M.D., Ph.D. of the MGH Department of Neurology, and corresponding author of the study.

The results suggest that physical activity might reduce b-amyloid (Ab)-related cortical thinning and preserve gray matter structure in regions of the brain that have been associated with episodic memory loss and Alzheimer’s-related neurodegeneration.

The underlying processes of Alzheimer’s disease can begin decades before clinical symptoms appear and is characterized by early accumulation of b-amyloid protein.

The new study is among the first to demonstrate the protective effects of physical activity and vascular risk management in the preclinical stage of Alzheimer’s disease, while there is an opportunity to intervene prior to the onset of substantial neuronal loss and clinical impairment.

“Because there are currently no disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer’s disease, there is a critical need to identify potential risk-altering factors that might delay progression of the disease,” Chhatwal said.

The new research published in the journal JAMA Neurology.

Read More…

Starting Exercise in Middle Age or Older is Tied to a Longer Healthier and Better Qualify of Life

It’s never too late to start exercising. Even if you already have have a serious chronic condition.

Lisa Rapaport, writing for Reuters Health »

… researchers assessed activity levels several times over eight years for 14,599 men and women who were between 40 and 80 years old at the outset. After the first eight years, researchers started tracking mortality for another 12.5 years, on average. During that period, there were 3,148 deaths, including 950 from cardiovascular disease and 1,091 from cancer.

The researchers measured both work and leisure-time physical activity in terms of energy expended per kilogram of body weight. Activity increases over time that were equivalent to going from sedentary to meeting the World Health Organization’s recommendation of at least 150 minutes a week of moderate physical activity were associated with a 24% lower risk of death from any cause, a 29% lower risk of cardiovascular death and an 11% lower risk of cancer death compared to those who remained inactive.

“This sends a strong message to all of us, irrespective of what our current life circumstances may be, since it is never too late to build physical activity into your daily routine in order to enjoy a longer healthier life,” said Soren Brage, senior author of the study and a researcher at the University of Cambridge in the UK.

Everybody benefitted from becoming more active,” Brage said by email. “This was also true for the subgroup of people who already had a serious chronic condition such as heart disease and cancer at baseline.”

Read the whole story …

Can Exercise Reverse Ageing

Stephen Harridge & Norman Lazarus writing for the BBC:

The greater health of older exercisers compared to their sedentary counterparts can lead people to believe physical activity can reverse or slow down the ageing process.

But the reality is that these active older people are exactly as they should be.

In our distant past we were hunter-gatherers, and our bodies are designed to be physically active.

So, if an active 80-year-old has a similar physiology to an inactive 50-year-old, it is the younger person who appears older than they should be, not the other way around.

Read More…

« Older posts

© 2020 Living 2.0

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑