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Tag: Diet

New study states bad diets kill more people than smoking

A balanced diet, with lots of fruits, vegetables, nuts and healthy oils,  is important for a long, healthy life. What we consume is what feeds every cell of our bodies.

Lindsey Bever, Washington Post, writes:

The problem, he said, is not only what people are eating, but it’s also what they’re not eating. The study estimated that globally, 3 million deaths were attributed to too much sodium — but another 3 million deaths were attributed to a lack of adequate whole grains, and another 2 million deaths were attributed to a lack of adequate fruit.

and

Afshin said countries where people eat a Mediterranean diet — high in heart-healthy fats and fiber — scored the best using the researchers’ model, with Israel ranking No. 1 in terms of the least number of diet-related deaths. France and Spain ranked second and third, respectively, according to the research. Afshin defined the Mediterranean diet as one with a high intake of fruits, vegetables, nuts and healthy oils, such as olive oil.

The United States ranked No. 43.

Uzbekistan, a former Soviet republic where refined carbohydrates such as bread and pasta are staples, scored the worst, with a death rate of 891 per a population of 100,000.

Low carb diets are linked to premature death

Yet another study is showing low carbohydrate diets, such as the fashionable paleo and keto variety, may be dangerous and could lead to increased risk of dying of heart disease, stroke, and cancer.

A healthy and balanced diet includes foods such as fruits, vegetables, bread, pasta, and potatoes.

Popular weight loss diets, that some may view as beneficial in the short-term, may come with a hefty long-term price tag.

“One thing is sure,” Dr Maciej Banach, professor of medicine at Medical University of Lodz, Poland, told Newsweek: “we should avoid [low carbohydrate diets].”

Banach explained low carbohydrate diets have been regarded as beneficial for our health in the past, but based on his team’s research it is now “clear” that is not true. And even though such regimes aid weight loss, the public should be “very careful” when following very restrictive diets, particularly those that feature no carbohydrates for long periods of time. Continue reading

Why stress causes people to overeat

Some research suggests a gender difference in stress-coping behavior, with women being more likely to turn to food and men to alcohol or smoking. And a Finnish study that included over 5,000 men and women showed that obesity was associated with stress-related eating in women but not in men.

Harvard researchers have reported that stress from work and other sorts of problems correlates with weight gain, but only in those who were overweight at the beginning of the study period. One theory is that overweight people have elevated insulin levels, and stress-related weight gain is more likely to occur in the presence of high insulin.

How much cortisol people produce in response to stress may also factor into the stress–weight gain equation. In 2007, British researchers designed an ingenious study that showed that people who responded to stress with high cortisol levels in an experimental setting were more likely to snack in response to daily hassles in their regular lives than low-cortisol responders.

More at Harvard Health

Low-carb diets could shorten life by four years

BBC:

Low-carb diets, such as Atkins, have become increasingly popular for weight loss and have shown promise for lowering the risk of some illnesses. But a US study over 25 years indicates that moderate carb consumption – or switching meat for plant-based protein and fats – is healthier.

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Fitness myths that do more harm than good

Myth: Exercise doesn’t help counter the negative effects of aging.
Truth: Regular exercise has key benefits for the brain and

Myth: A sluggish metabolism is the main reason you gain weight as you age.
Truth: Our metabolisms barely budge after age 30, according to the National Institutes of Health. Something else is to blame.

Myth: To stay in shape, you need to work out only once or twice a week.
Truth: Once or twice a week won’t cut it for sustained health benefits.

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We’re in a new age of obesity. How did it happen?

The Guardian:

Yes, we ate more in 1976, but differently. Today, we buy half as much fresh milk per person, but five times more yoghurt, three times more ice cream and – wait for it – 39 times as many dairy desserts. We buy half as many eggs as in 1976, but a third more breakfast cereals and twice the cereal snacks; half the total potatoes, but three times the crisps. While our direct purchases of sugar have sharply declined, the sugar we consume in drinks and confectionery is likely to have rocketed (there are purchase numbers only from 1992, at which point they were rising rapidly. Perhaps, as we consumed just 9kcal a day in the form of drinks in 1976, no one thought the numbers were worth collecting.) In other words, the opportunities to load our food with sugar have boomed. As some experts have long proposed, this seems to be the issue.

The shift has not happened by accident.

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Health and science myths and misconceptions

In this video you will learn about the following myths and misconceptions, and why they start and why they endure:

Health myths:

  • Detoxification is good for the body
  • Vitamin C helps colds
  • Spinach makes you stronger, and contains a lot of iron
  • Letting babies cry makes them stronger
  • Eating chocolate helps people lose weight
  • Strong liquor aids digestion
  • One glass of red wine is healthy

Science myths:

  • Passenger’s mobile phones and laptops can make airplanes lose control and crash
  • Listening to Mozart’s music makes children more intelligent

https://youtu.be/GtE6l1_Pl5s

American adults keep getting fatter

Matt Richtel and Andrew Jacobs, The New York Times:

The latest data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey comes at a time when the food industry is pushing back against stronger public health measures aimed at combating obesity.

In recent NAFTA negotiations, the Trump administration has proposed rules favored by major food companies that would limit the ability of the United States, Mexico and Canada to require prominent labels on packaged foods warning about the health risks of foods high in sugar and fat.

While the latest survey data doesn’t explain why Americans continue to get heavier, nutritionists and other experts cite lifestyle, genetics, and, most importantly, a poor diet as factors. Fast food sales in the United States rose 22.7 percent from 2012 to 2017, according to Euromonitor, while packaged food sales rose 8.8 percent.

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