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The USA Allow Food Additives that Canada, Europe, China, and others Claim are Toxic

Chemical Structure of Potassium Bromate

Chemical Structure of Potassium Bromate

Potassium bromate, for example, is also illegal in Canada, China, the European Union, Brazil, India, the United Kingdom, and elsewhere because it causes cancer. In the United States it has been legal to add to food since it was first patented for use in baking bread in 1914.

Troy Farah writing for The Guardian:

But despite petitions from several advocacy groups – some dating back decades – the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) still considers these to be Gras or “generally recognized as safe” to eat, though plenty of experts disagree.

“The system for ensuring that ingredients added to food are safe is broken,” said Lisa Lefferts, senior scientist at the consumer advocacy group Center for Science in the Public Interest. Lefferts, who specializes in food additives, said that once a substance is in the food supply, the FDA rarely takes further action, even when there is evidence that it isn’t safe.

The Center for Science in the Public Interest petitioned the FDA to ban potassium bromate two decades ago due to cancer concerns, but the FDA’s response, according to a letter from the agency, was that it couldn’t examine the issue due to “limited availability of resources and other agency priorities.”

Read More…

Doctors are saying gut health is as important as heart heath

Increasingly researchers are finding that your intestines not only digest food, but may also regulate mood, emotion, and play a central role in your body’s response to disease.

What you eat feeds every single cell in your body.

Sushrut Jangi, The Boston Globe:

Avoid processed deli meats and red meat while feeding the dense jungle of bacteria in the colon with fibers, fruits, and vegetables. Siegel says unhealthy and sedentary lifestyles rife with fast foods and processed meats are contributing to the rise in colon cancer among young people. A lot of people go to the deli and buy very expensive turkey breast and think they are eating healthy, Siegel says. Shifting away from the standard Western diet to the Mediterranean diet — composed primarily of plant-based foods, olive oil, fish, and mixed nuts — supports both gut health and a healthy heart. Sprinkling food with curcumin — the activated ingredient in turmeric — may dampen inflammation. Routine exercise staves off obesity, which does wonders for the gastrointestinal tract and reduces cancer risk. While particular diets are effective in treating specific gut conditions, consult with a gastroenterologist or nutritionist before pursuing anything radical.

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Obesity is on track to overtake smoking as the single biggest cause of preventable cancer in British women

If the projected trends continue, obesity as a cause of cancer in women will overtake smoking by 2043, the report says.

The figures for men are different as men are more likely to smoke and to get tobacco-related cancers. The gap between obesity and smoking as causes of cancer is expected to close much later than in woman.

While more males than females are overweight, obesity has a greater effect on women as some of the most common obesity-related cancers predominantly affect them, such as breast and womb cancers.

More at The Guardian

World Health Organization states alcohol is responsible for one in 20 deaths worldwide

Alcohol is linked to more than 200 health conditions, including liver cirrhosis and some cancers.

Alcohol kills three million people worldwide each year — more than AIDS, violence and road accidents combined, the World Health Organization said Friday, adding that men are particularly at risk.

The UN health agency’s latest report on alcohol and health pointed out that alcohol causes more than one in 20 deaths globally each year, including drink driving, alcohol-induced violence and abuse and a multitude of diseases and disorders.

Men account for more than three quarters of alcohol-related deaths, the nearly 500-page report found.

More at AFP via Yahoo

Remember when a glass of wine a day was good for you? Here’s why that changed.

Selection bias, that is chosing who is to be studied, has a lot to do with research outcomes.

An analysis from 2007 by an international group of alcohol epidemiologists and addiction researchers, published in Annals of Epidemiology, notes that “as people progress into late middle and old age, their consumption of alcohol declines in tandem with ill health, frailty, dementia, and/or use of medications.” That decline means that, as people become less well—even if they’re not elderly—they will also tend to stop drinking. So when they enroll in a study on drinking and get lumped into the group of non-drinkers, they’ll artificially inflate the mortality risk—even though their deaths have nothing to do with alcohol abstention. It’s not that teetotaling made them more likely to die during the course of the study; it’s that being closer to death made them more likely to quit alcohol. And people who drink, but are able to keep their drinking at a reasonable level, are likely to have the kind of health and social advantages associated with living longer.

And

“People who in their teens or twenties begin to drink, don’t die or become alcoholics, and are able to maintain drinking at low levels—that’s a select group of drinkers,” says Naimi. And that means when epidemiologists go looking at people who are still moderate drinkers in middle age, they’re missing some key people. “If you look at people in midlife who are stable, moderate drinkers, that means they didn’t die from their drinking and they didn’t quit drinking.” That sounds obvious, but let’s take a second to think about it: Alcohol is an addictive substance. People who have had a healthy relationship with it their entire lives are probably people who also have a bunch of other advantageous qualities.

And

There is still a chance that one or two drinks a day has some benefit for your heart. If it does exist, researchers like Naimi think it’s probably pretty small, and that matters because there are a lot of other diseases that we know alcohol increases your risk of contracting. These include liver cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, oral cancer, tuberculosis, pancreatitis, cirrhosis and related liver diseases, and a whole host of others.

Low carb diets are linked to premature death

Yet another study is showing low carbohydrate diets, such as the fashionable paleo and keto variety, may be dangerous and could lead to increased risk of dying of heart disease, stroke, and cancer.

A healthy and balanced diet includes foods such as fruits, vegetables, bread, pasta, and potatoes.

Popular weight loss diets, that some may view as beneficial in the short-term, may come with a hefty long-term price tag.

“One thing is sure,” Dr Maciej Banach, professor of medicine at Medical University of Lodz, Poland, told Newsweek: “we should avoid [low carbohydrate diets].”

Banach explained low carbohydrate diets have been regarded as beneficial for our health in the past, but based on his team’s research it is now “clear” that is not true. And even though such regimes aid weight loss, the public should be “very careful” when following very restrictive diets, particularly those that feature no carbohydrates for long periods of time. Continue reading

The Unintended Consequences of LED Lighting

The blue light of modern LED’s is throwing our circadian rhythms out of whack.

This biological cycle regulates how our body functions and repairs itself, and not only includes sleep and wakefulness. Allowing our bodies to get out of sync can contribute to illness, obesity, diabetes, and an increased risk of cancer.

Medium:

The widespread use of high-energy visible (HEV) light may have mighty ambitions, but its ubiquity has enormous, unintended, and unforeseen consequences on human health, well-being, and culture.

Related: Blue light accelerates blindness

Six cooking habits that undermine your diet

Lesley Beck, Globe and Mail:

If your goal is to eat a healthier diet – one that’s packed with nutrient- and antioxidant-rich whole foods – consider adding more home-cooked meals to your menu.

Research has found that people who frequently eat home-cooked meals have a higher intake of fruit and vegetables, healthier cholesterol and blood sugar levels and a lower risk of being overweight.

Depending on how you cook and prep your foods, though, you may be unknowingly undermining your diet.

  • Washing raw meat or poultry won’t make it clean or free of bacteria
  • Overheated your cooking oil
  • Immediately adding chopped garlic to the sauté pan reduces the beneficial phytochemicals
  • Over cooking meat contains more cancer-causing carcinogens called heterocyclic amines (HCAs)
  • Overcooking cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts) can strip them of their cancer-fighting potential
  • Removing the peel or toss away stems and green tops reduces valuable fibre, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.

Read the article for more details.

The link between drinking alcohol and breast cancer that the alcohol industry has being trying to hide

Stephanie Mencimer, Mother Jones:

Way back in 1988, the World Health Organization declared alcohol a Group 1 carcinogen, meaning that it’s been proved to cause cancer. There is no known safe dosage in humans, according to the WHO. Alcohol causes at least seven types of cancer, but it kills more women from breast cancer than from any other. The International Agency for Research on Cancer estimates that for every drink consumed daily, the risk of breast cancer goes up 7 percent.

The research linking alcohol to breast cancer is deadly solid. There’s no controversy here. Alcohol, regardless of whether it’s in Everclear or a vintage Bordeaux, is carcinogenic. More than 100 studies over several decades have reaffirmed the link with consistent results. The National Cancer Institute says alcohol raises breast cancer risk even at low levels.

I’m a pretty voracious reader of health news, and all of this came as a shock. I’d been told red wine was supposed to defend against heart disease, not give you cancer. And working at Mother Jones, I thought I’d written or read articles on everything that could maybe possibly cause cancer: sugar, plastic, milk, pesticides, shampoo, the wrong sunscreen, tap water…You name it, we’ve reported on the odds that it might give you cancer. As I schlepped back and forth to the hospital for surgery and radiation treatments, I started to wonder how I could know about the risk associated with all these other things but not alcohol. It turns out there was a good reason for my ignorance.

American adults keep getting fatter

Matt Richtel and Andrew Jacobs, The New York Times:

The latest data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey comes at a time when the food industry is pushing back against stronger public health measures aimed at combating obesity.

In recent NAFTA negotiations, the Trump administration has proposed rules favored by major food companies that would limit the ability of the United States, Mexico and Canada to require prominent labels on packaged foods warning about the health risks of foods high in sugar and fat.

While the latest survey data doesn’t explain why Americans continue to get heavier, nutritionists and other experts cite lifestyle, genetics, and, most importantly, a poor diet as factors. Fast food sales in the United States rose 22.7 percent from 2012 to 2017, according to Euromonitor, while packaged food sales rose 8.8 percent.

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